Churches

Surp Sarkis Armenian Orthodox Church (Dêra Surp Sarkîs),surp,sarkis,armenian,orthodox,church,dêra,surp,sarkîs

 

Surp Sarkis Armenian Orthodox Church (Dêra Surp Sarkîs) This church is in the neighborhood of Alipaşa, on Karabulut Street. It has two floors, a space for women on the top floor and on the entrance floor the litany hall. One can today view the extant baptismal room, the stairway leading to the women’s floor, the altar, the courtyard, and the remnant walls of a destroyed school.
While the exact date of construction is unknown, the first written records we have of the church date to the sixteenth century. Because the church was used for a short time as a rice processing plant, it is also widely known as the “Rice Church”.

 

 

 

 


 

Protestant Church (Dêra Protestanan),protestant,church,dêra,protestanan

Protestant Church (Dêra Protestanan)

This church is in Hasırlı Neighborhood, on Muallak Street, and was built in the 19th century. It’s a two-floor structure constructed in a rectangular shape of cut basalt, the second floor a devotedly female social space. Until recently the church was used as a storage facility. Like the aforementioned Armenian church, it too underwent restoration in 2009.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Virgin Mary Ancient Assyrian Church (Dêra Dayê Meryamayê),virgin,mary,ancient,assyrian,church,dêra,dayê,meryamayê

Virgin MaryAncient Assyrian Church (Dêra Dayê Meryamayê) 
Built atop a temple used since well before the Common Era as a space of sun worship, The Mother Mary Church was built in the third century C.E, and today is located in Alipaşa Neighborhood on the street called Ana Sokak. Belonging to the Yakubi denomination, also called Assyrian Orthodox, it is one of the few active churches in a city once with a large and vibrant Christian community. The structure includes a library, quarters for the Patriarchate, a guest house, and residence quarters, along with three splendid courtyards.
Housing many historical artifacts, the church’s doors are made of walnut wood, and in the interior, the centuries-old paintings of saints and the silver lamps are particularly remarkable.
As is custom in many Assyrian churches, there are a number of tombs of past patriarchs and priests housed within the church. When, in 1034, the Patriarchate of the church was relocated to Diyarbakır, the Mother Mary Church served the congregation for eight centuries. In 1933, following the deportation and fleeing of many of the city’s Assyrian Christians, the church was linked to the Mardin Assyrian Metropolitan Bishopric, and remains so today.

 

 


 

Mar Petyun Chaldean Catholic Church (Dêra Keldaniyên Katolik a Mar Petyûn),mar,petyun,chaldean,catholic,church,dêra,keldaniyên,katolik,a,mar,petyûn

Mar Petyun Chaldean Catholic Church (Dêra Keldaniyên Katolik a Mar Petyûn)

In Özdemir Neighborhood on Şeftali Sokak, Peach Street, is this 17th-century church. From January 8, 1681 until recently, the church served as the Diyarbakır Chaldean Patriarchate for Eastern Assyrian Christians, also known as Catholic Chaldeans. The church is divided by archways into four naves. It is open for worship.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Virgin MaryAncient Assyrian Church (Dêra Dayê Meryamayê),virgin,maryancient,assyrian,church,dêra,dayê,meryamayê

Virgin MaryAncient Assyrian Church
(Dêra Dayê Meryamayê)
Built atop a temple used since well before the Common Era as a space of sun worship, The Mother Mary Church was built in the third century C.E, and today is located in Alipaşa Neighborhood on the street called Ana Sokak. Belonging to the Yakubi denomination, also called Assyrian Orthodox, it is one of the few active churches in a city once with a large and vibrant Christian community. The structure includes a library, quarters for the Patriarchate, a guest house, and residence quarters, along with three splendid courtyards.
Housing many historical artifacts, the church’s doors are made of walnut wood, and in the interior, the centuries-old paintings of saints and the silver lamps are particularly remarkable.
As is custom in many Assyrian churches, there are a number of tombs of past patriarchs and priests housed within the church. When, in 1034, the Patriarchate of the church was relocated to Diyarbakır, the Mother Mary Church served the congregation for eight centuries. In 1933, following the deportation and fleeing of many of the city’s Assyrian Christians, the church was linked to the Mardin Assyrian Metropolitan Bishopric, and remains so today.

 


 

Surp Giragos Armenian Orthodox Church (Dêra Surp Giragos),surp,giragos,armenian,orthodox,church,dêra,surp,giragos

Surp Giragos Armenian Orthodox Church (Dêra Surp Giragos)

While the exact origin of the church is unknown, references to Surp Giragos first appear in written records in 1517. The church is located on the street called Göçmen Sokak in Özdemir Neighborhood. In 1827 and again in 1880, there were major fires in the church, and after 1880, additional buildings were attached to the church. After these additions, the structure became the only Armenian church in the world with seven altars, two of them being on the second floor where women gather and five close to the entrance. The church once held as many as 3,000 worshippers. To the left of the church is the Surp Hagop Chapel. The chapel is a remnant of the post-1880s renovations. Linked to the main church by its main entrance, the chapel is still in good condition today. Around the time of World War I, the church was used as the headquarters for German military officers, and until 1960 it was used as a storage space for the military, for Sümerbank, and for other similar aims. Recently, however, the church was repaired by the diaspora Diyarbakır Armenian community and returned to its original use.
The main church, the chapel, the Patriarchate’s building, the housing quarters, wells, and three courtyards have lost little of their splendor, and are certainly worth a visit.

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